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hosting "the doily show" america's greatest satirical lace centerpiece program. (laughter) he is eviscerating that lace work and that's a direct copy quote. our guest tonight is senator rand paul, he's going to be with us. (cheers and applause) he's also where we begin tonight. what has senator paul been up to? >> senator rand paul of kentucky heads to iowa. >> he has planned to visit south carolina and nevada. >> tomorrow he headlines a g.o.p. dinner new hampshire. >> i know rand paul, i think he'll run in 2016. >> what stands between the paul dynasty and 2016? >> well, i'll tell you the first thing that stands between them, three (bleep)ing years! (laughter) that's over 50 new iphones from now. (laughter) why are we talking about this election? that brings us to yet another installment of "can't you at least wait until jon stewart comes back?" (laughter) seriously! this is my last week doing this! it's not just that the media is already ramping up their 2016 coverage, it's this some of them are already trying to wind it down. >> i predict the hard right is going to take over
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
of providing care to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with
of the egyptians. >> america cannot determine the future of egypt. that's a task for the egyptian people. we don't take sides with any particular party or political figure. i know it is tempting inside of egypt to blame the united states or the west or some other outside actor for what's gone wrong. that kind of approach will do nothing to help egyptians achieve the future that they deserve. we want egypt to succeed. we want a peaceful, democratic, prosperous egypt. that's our interest. >> joining me today, political editor and white house correspondent at "the huffington post," sam stein. "washington post" columnist jonathan capehart, founder and editor at large, charlie senate, jon meacham author of "thomas jefferson -- the art of power." joining us now from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent ayman muhyeldin. we're hearing from the spokesperson for the muslim brotherhood that they want to remain nonviolent and peaceful. we are also at the same time hearing news that there is live ammo being launched by morsi supporters and molotov cocktails. can you give us the latest on the situation on th
shouted back no america, america. i had thrown my passport at them i was born in washington d.c.. they would kick me in the stomach when i would get my breath back and as others join the firing squad i would say america, america. at some point they take the guns from our heads we believe because we were from the same country. they would have to pay a price for killing us that they would never have to pay for killing them. a red cross jeep pulled up and the driver of the red cross jeep picked up this old man who was in a sewer ditch next to us. every time the soldiers beat him he would put up his hands and a prayer sign and they would smash the buts of their rifles into his face. we drove off to a hospital and they stopped us to get away from us and we drove as a human mouse to the hospital. they hung off the top of the ge. at the hospital the doctors and nurses started to cry when they saw us. not because we were in worship and the people. that we were being dragged there. i think because of what we have represented. not just allen and i but i think americans. not just timor b
at "good morning america" one of the most hot dog resingsists. they would call me and say things. i would say good morning america. i did like the switch board. good morning america. they would say, was that a nazi that you had on today? i would say, yeah. you know, they would say how could you have a nazi on television? listen, i don't book the show, first of all, and if they're all in argentina, you have to fly them here. >> john: but they're blond, blue eyed. >> brand completely aggravate me about where is joan london. how the hell do i know? i'm answering phones. do i know where joan london is? >> john: you coul a receptionis. >> i got fired from that job. >> a beinger the chance of getting married is the same chance as being kidnapped by terrorists. to me they're the same thing. >> that wasn't humidity, that was the 80s. >> the hairdos i've been subjected to, oh my god. >> john: i bet they all looked great. >> where is that from? >> john: one of our staff found it. >> and the shiny jacket. >> john: it was from the 80s. i think one of the best moments are current network. i thought wa
creating competitive industry. >> but since 2000 there's only new carrier in our country virgin america. we have on the others one in minnesota but there new carrier viable since 2000. and don't you think there are to entry that make it hard for new airlines to competitive? over thenk if you look last many years there have been industry.ts into the jetblue is a great example of a -- that sprang grown last decade and has nationwide. so, i think there are ample opportunities and capital vailable for new airlines to enter the market. >> i note that jetblue is only we have nowrket and these three major carriers. do you want to respond? first off, again noting how complementary our two networks by putting them together we create a third competitor -- fourth competitor to what are three airlines larger ta and s, united, dell southwest and allows more competition, not less. 12 laps overlatch being out put00 -- overlapping we can more efficient service to consumers. also note that in the $1 billion synergies that i noted there s not one assumed fare increase. he synergies are not built on assum
in the region. this is something that is going to require america's attention, hopefully the entire international community's attention. >> senator john mccain came on "new day" very strong on this. he believes the u.s.'s credibility in the region has been hurt, that a situation like syria, that he believes, there's been delay, and it has led to a bolds by the regime there, that in egypt that what many believe is a coup wasn't called a coup. >> i am sympathetic to senator mccain's passion for helping people work through what is an extraordinarily difficult and heart-breaking situation, but what i think the american people also expect me to do as president is to think through what we do from the perspective what is in our long-term national interest. sometimes what we've seen is folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff that does not turn out well, gets us mired in very difficult situations, can result in us being drawn in to very expensive, difficult, costly interventions that actually breed more resentment in the region. we have to think through strategically what is
is america's biggest foreign policy head ache right now. president obama and his security team met yesterday to decide how to respond. >> abc's global affairs correspondent martha raddatz traveled to cairo for an exclusive interview with the man at center of the crisis there. >> he is one of the most powerful men in egypt right now, a civilian leader behind the military's brutal crackdown on its own people. >> no country will allow to have a paramilitary people taking to the streets, preventing simple inhabitants in the neighborhood not able to go out. >> reporter: they were killed for doing that. >> we didn't provoke it. we asked them to go freely. we started by throwing only tear gas and they answered back by firing. >> reporter: the result, more than 1,000 egyptians dead. most of them for protesting the military seizing power. you do not believe egyptian security forces used excessive force at all? >> i cannot say that all of the police are peaceful. of course, there are some exceptions. i cannot say 100%. but i am sure that by and large they try to abide. >> reporter: so no remorse for w
parties and a funeral, plus plenty of valet parking in america's gilded capitol. read the book and engage on our facebook page and twitter. "washington journal" continues. host: at the table now, michael steele, the former r.n.c. chairman from 200-2011, thank you for joining us. we've been talking about syria, do you see a division within the republican party on syria? guest: i don't think there's been a clear voice that's come out about what republicans say about this. certainly there is a union anymority about what we need to do next, which is definitely deal with the use of chemical weapons by the assad government. but i think a lot of republicans are waiting to see exactly where the president is going to go with the foreign policy. you have the secretary of state calling this a moral obscenity. so the tone and the rhetoric is there. the question is now what are the next steps? the president and his team have been very good, at least in this instance, of getting and keeping the congress informed, getting members of congress in on the conversation early enough, so that should some type
worse. the pace of decline of america's middle class has actually speeded up in the obama years. median income down 4.4% since june of '09. >> so he accelerated income ee quality. >> he increased it. we're going to watch varney and company on friday. the friday edition is always the best and often ends in song. >> it is? >> yes. >> there's a promo. >> thanks, everyone. >>> this guy says black people can't survive unless a lot of whites are killed. and guess what? he works for the department of homeland security. so why hasn't he been fired? a former department of justice employee says he knows and he's going to join us next. >>> and barely even back to school, just beginning to look like christmas at some stores. what the heck is happening? we'll tell you why this year is different and starting much earlier. >> oh, no. ♪ so then the little tiny chipmunks go all the way up... ♪ [ female announcer ] when your swapportunity comes, take it. ♪ what? what? what? [ female announcer ] yoplait. it is so good. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, what? what? relief is at han
.m. eastern here on cing span 3. c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your it's provider -- by your television provider. >> host: and this week on "the communicators," gordon smith who is president and ceo of the national association of broadcasters, our guest reporter is paul kirby of telecommunications report. senator smith, you started at nab nearly four years ago. how have the issues changed in those four years? >> guest: well, it seems like the issues just keep on coming, and they tend to be very major issues affecting both radio and television. but clearly on the radio side, the whole issue of performance rights, performance tax, whatever you want to tribe it as, is an ongoing challenge. hopefully, the day will arrive when both the digital and the terrestrial platform can come up with a model that actually grows music and works for both. but right now one has an unsustainable business model, and the other one works for radio, but on the other hand, we need it to work for the performers too. but if you provide a rate t
% of all children live in poverty. >> stephanie: in america. >> in america. >> stephanie: you say your wealth inequality statistics are staggering, and people just hear that, but i think they don't know what that means, but the word staggering, i think is dead on, don't you? >> yeah, i mean there's words in the industrialized nation, and it has gotten a lot worse, and what he used to pride ours on, what the american dream has always been, it's upward mobility that you can be born with nothing and then die a rich person. and the statistics now are that this really doesn't happen anymore. you get to be in the middle class the same way you get to be king, by virtue of birth. we just don't move anymore >> stephanie: and how do we resolve these numbers by kicking the downed to -- down-trodden. poor shaming is the justification that people are -- leave it to americans to kick people when they are down. and that's what they did again with the farm bill. >> they tell poor people to get a job. and they have a job, and they say they can't feed their family or pay their rent, and republicans say
america and the reason the company is one of the big success stories out of the 1990s is that jeff has a philosophy of making bets that are going to pay off over decades. he is not worried about this quarter's earnings, this year's earnings, he's not worried about making a profit to impress wall street this year. and the company is also mocked and criticized for that but only by short-term people who don't understand the value of taking those profits and reinvesting them and that's why amazon has been so successful. so looking at "the post," they are losing money now. my guess is he will be patient as long as he thinks "the post" is making very intelligent investments for the future. what happens to the newspaper, is he going to combine newspaper delivery with some of amazon's physical delivery that they're moving into now? maybe so. will he eliminate the paper? eventually, i would imagine so. will he work on the website and the distribution and building out the newsroom so the "washington post" is much deeper and broader? certainly possible. >> you mentioned similarities between digit
for something other than power generation and our gas grills. nat gas is cheaper in north america than anywhere else on earth. which is why i've been on a crusade for anything using natural gas as fuel for surface vehicles. and we need chart industries, gtls, gas to liquids. chart makes the precision engineer cryogenic equipment, allowing it to be used for fuel for trucks, they also make engine tanks that hold stuff for heavy duty tanks and an industrial gas business and a biomedical division where they make liquid oxygen therapy doing tremendously. the stock has been on fire, it's up 200%, it's a triple since i got behind it in february of 2011, up 20% since we last interviewed the ceo at the end of may. the company reported strong quarter on july 30th. let's check in with samuel thomas, the president and ceo of chart industries, find out more about his prospects. welcome back to "mad money." good to see you, sam. >> good to see you. >> i've got a ton to ask you. but first, what the heck is this boost behind us? >> jim, this is a self-contained filling station for lng, also can be used for nat
not? >> got to go in. >> come on rob, get it in there to get three points. >> one point. >> america is still learning the beautiful game. >> that will help. >> coming up next, economist dr. jeffe jeffery sacks joins us and bill bratton and nbc political director chuck todd. >> chuck winked at you. >> oh, god. >> wink again. >> the winker. >> he just did. >> and, of course, the great andrea mitchell. >> she's great. >> "morning joe" back in a moment. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping i'to guard their manhood with trnew depend shields and guards. the discreet protection that's just for guys. now, it's your turn. get my training tips at guardyourmanhood.com wit's hard to find contractors with the passion and the skill, and that's why we use angie's list. online or on the phone, we help you hire right the first time with honest reviews on over 720 local services. i want it done right. i don't want to have to worry about it or have to come back and redo it. with angie's list, i was able to turn my home into the home of my dreams. for
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. this is true as much of the recent past, as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end from having some passing people to talk to you about joe kennedy, including large numbers of kennedys, i must prefer working from written documents to listen to people talk and try to figure out what's real, what's imagined what they know, what they think they know because someone told them for what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct passion of the past that is so close to us, and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify them to move beyond the clichÉd about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers. esp
driving range. no wonder volt is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. ♪ the 2013 volt. charge ahead of the rest in the hov lane. ♪ >>> fox news >>> fox news alert, it is over. hannah anderson is safe, and james lee dimaggio the man accused of snatching her is shot dead by an fbi sniper. jonathan gilliam is in the studio with me as we get calls from the family and others throughout the west coast, and jonathan here in new york with me. now, you were saying that the team is the same team that took down the boston marathoner, or involved in the boston marathon investigation and sounds like one shooter. what do you think? describe the scene in idaho as you perceive it? >> from what we know a helicopter out there and spotters in the helicopter, and snipers as well, but they weren't that far in the woods so maybe they were guiding a team in or maybe a shot from the hill, and they had the capabilities of doing both. >> they had the capability of taking him out or from the chopper, but you think that the shots came from the ground? >> i don't know, g
in america." the pendulum is swinging in the republican party now. as the party moves hard right, will they really try another establishment time like romney or dole or mccain or christie or jeb bush? or will the party go for one of its tea party heroes like rand paul? here with me now is the author of the great book "collision 2016." dan, let's talk about what you call the subterranean campaign of 2012 and what it offers us in the future. >> we think of the campaign as the campaign we all cover all the time. everything we talk about, every utterance, every gaffe, every debate, every movement. and that's part of politics and in many ways the interesting and enjoyable part of politics, but it's not necessarily the decisive part of politics. there are important and powerful underlying forces that effect every campaign. in 2012, one was the economy. would it be just good enough to allow president obama to win re-election or bad enough to deny re-election. another was voter anger. which direction would it go? a third was the deep red/blue divide and how that shaped attitudes beyond w
is america's best-selling plug-in. that's american ingenuity to find new roads. right now, get a 2013 chevrolet volt for around $269 per month. "that starts with one of the world's most advancedy," distribution systems," "and one of the most efficient trucking networks," "with safe, experienced drivers." "we work directly with manufacturers," "eliminating costly markups," "and buy directly from local farmers in every region of the country." "when you see our low prices, remember the wheels turning behind the scenes, delivering for millions of americans, everyday. "dedication: that's the real walmart" to benefit cancer research i rode across the atlantic. crossing an ocean with your body as the motor, it hurts. so i brought advil to help me stay strong during the toughest journey of my life. [ male announcer ] paul ridley had a choice of pain relievers, but he chose advil. because nothing is stronger on tough pain. nothing. not tylenol. not aleve. [ paul ] when people are counting on me to come through, my answer is advil. [ male announcer ] real people. real pain. real relief. advil.
connections. apply online or at a bank of america near you. it also repels most ticks before they can attach. the leading brand kills, but doesn't repel. a tick that isn't repelled or killed may attach and make a meal of us. get veterinarian recommended k9 advantix ii! look! she wears the scarlet markings! [ man ] out! your kind is not welcome here! nor your odd predilections! miracle whip is tangy and sweet, not odd. [ man ] it's evil! if you'd try it, you'd know. she speaketh the truth! [ crowd gasps ] [ woman ] reverend? ♪ can i have some? [ goat bleats ] ♪ . . . . a waldorf astoria. get great rates at our ten top hotel brands during the great getaway. book now at hiltongreatgetaways.com. yep. how'd that happen? um... [ female announcer ] some things are hard for kids to digest. rice krispies are easy. because they're made of rice, which is gentle on tummies. it's simple as... ♪ snap! crackle! pop! ♪ rice krispies! ♪ snap! crackle! pop! okay, a? b? b. a? that's a great choice. let me show you some faucets to go along with that. with the latest styles and guaranteed low prices, y
four-year-old in america it's time for the minimum wage to go up. (cheers) but i won't be able to do it alone, so i'm going to be calling... on all of us to take up this cause. good jobs; a better bargain for the middle class... and the folks who are working to get into the middle class; an economy that grows from the middle-out. that's what we need. (cheers) >>> you can join the "news nation" on twitter. find us at our twitter page @newsnation. meanwhile, strikes from fast food restaurants across the nation tops our story today. the protesters picked up steam this week. workers are growing louder for higher wages and the right to form a union. the national restaurant association which represents many of the restaurants where workers are protesting claims they operate on very thin profit margins and raising wages could hamper their ability to hire. >> dozens of people exchanged vous at midnight as same-sex marriage became legal in those states. couples in rhode island began tying the knot this morning. >>> and george zimmerman resurfaces again, this time texas dash cam video shows an
this episode illustrates two important elements in modern america politics. the first one is, the rise of a super staffer in the case of benton who as peter mentioned is is married to the granddaughter of ron paul. he's got leverage here because the fact is, mitch mcconnell, veteran u.s. senator, the senate minority leader, needs this staffer badly. because he's a bridge to rand paul and the paul universe. mitch mcconnell already has a primary opponent on the right. he cannot afford to alienate the paul world by dumping the staffer overboard he would do just that. it's a remarkable illustration of the role of a super staffer now in american politics. the other big point it illustrates, john, is this. the tea party's rise and near dominance now in the republican party. the fact that a powerful senator like mitch mcconnell, well funded, 10 million bucks in the bank, the fact he so needs the tea party on his side that he has a staffer here criticizing him on tape and he's not dumping him, tells you all you have to know about the role in today's gop of the tea party. >> ross, let me ask yo
states and said south and latin america which was very unusual for a. so she had the wanderlust from the time she was a year and grow , very proud -- war of the fact. making the best of the best situation. then once she married is was a way to escape both the bush justice of the children, or have some of the onset of the weaknesses and in some way perhaps also a form of birth control pill is a catholic church would not have allowed any. >> she even maintained her schumer. the early 1970's. if i had known it was a competition and might have had more than nine permit. >> happy to surpass. >> one trip when they went to russia and then it was unusual for women. >> 1937, as of this would have been prior. >> her son in the apple of her eye had guns hang fund. -- the epitome of a capitalist and he said, you need to know the ways of future. socialism may be one of them. absolutely for the year between reps cool and when he went to harvard he went to london to study and then spent some time in the soviet this well fact-finding and would report back. so taken with his report that she decided t
. they basically i believe probably are looking at all the cell phone calls in america every day. also, i don't think it's good police work. i think we get overwhelmed with data. we have so much data that he we don't notice when the -- goes back to check that, his name is misspelled and we don't know he has gone back. we need more people doing specific intelligence data on people who we have suspicion of rather than doing it on suspicion list severance of all american phone calls. >> john: let me switch gears and talk to you about obama care because that is going to be a big topic of discussion when congress comes back in a couple of weeks. you support the defunding of obama care but you recently acknowledged you don't believe it will happen and get through the senate. your only leave then lever is to defund obama care. that would shut down the government which you have stated publicly you don't think is a good idea. what do you really have left here, senator? >> well, i don't think shutting down the government is a good idea. but i do think that we were elected, conservatives were elected to
the contents of vast amounts of america's emails and text communications in and out of the country hunting for people who mention information about foreigners under surveillance. while it has long known that the agency conducts searches, this reveals more about the scale of secret operations. government officials say it was authorized by the fisa amendment act which congress approved eavesdropping as long as it was a non-citizen abroad. it gets a little in the weeds for me. >> i know. stephanie: i mean, that's what's -- as we've said, jim, it's not that i don't have concerns about it, i think that's why it's not that understandable for the normal person to go i don't know what degree they're doing what exactly. >> exactly, and that's what's so troubling about it, that it's just a broad, you know, drag net. stephanie: yeah. you know what will make us feel better? maggot on fax. hi, bob. that would be a stretch to call any fax about maggots fun, but go ahead. >> they are very handy for eating dead flesh. you have a piece of flesh that's dead on your body that's rotting, doctors, american doc
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america, you had no idea. it angers me because there's a responsibility there to the people investing in these companies, listed on that exchange, and, you know, to make sure they're aware of exactly what was going on. and they were left out. >> i think in fairness to greifeld it would be a question of priorities in his view. probably you have a relatively small team, the job has got to be to ensure that financially nobody gets hurt rather than appearing on cable television i think is the point he's trying to make. >> no question. i absolutely agree with that. i'm not saying that. i'm saying if you're sitting in the middle of the country you have no idea what's locked up and why. the press is the only conduit of information to you. i would say that we had an issue with facebook. we had an issue with the flash crash. we had an issue yesterday with what occurred on the nasdaq, technological issue. what i have an issue with is how it's communiqued to the public and how mom and pop in middle america are actually going to get informed on that and they should be informed because they're the
of america, can i ask you about that industry? obviously the billionaires are advancing on individual titles. you see bezos with "the washington post." the koch brothers may be coming in. warren buffett has been advancing into newspapers. what's the future of the industry in the country. i know you've done studies of how revenue streams ever changing. will it be as strong as it is in two decades? >> it's tremendous you're getting the interest in the investment from very savvy, very smart people from multiple backgrounds. the entire media landscape absolutely is transitioning. digital is changing the way all of us interact with media. i believe that newspapers are uniquely well positioned to take advantage of that transformation. we have unique content whether it's an opportunity newspaper who is covering an event, a sports event, city council that no one else covers, or a national or global brand like "the washington post," like "the new york times." the amount of unique, original content generated by newspapers surpasses any other media and whether it's delivered in print, in digital, onlin
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)